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Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium

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The Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium (EALS) at American University is an annual meeting for young professionals who work in the arts. It is an opportunity to discuss the issues, unique or universal, that affect arts organizations with students, peers, and experienced professionals. Organized and run by a team of graduate students in the AU Arts Management Program, the Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium features a keynote address, a networking reception, and multiple professional development sessions held throughout the day.

EALS Keynote: Adrian Ellis

This Sunday we are gratified to welcome Adrian Ellis to the halls of Katzen for our keynote speech at the Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium. Ellis brings to us his wealth of personal experience in the arts management sector. The EALS team is so excited to present this talented arts manager that we’re opening up his keynote speech to the public. All are welcome to join us, April 15th, 5 pm, at the Katzen Arts Center in the Abramson Family Recital Hall to hear Mr. Ellis speak, free of charge.

For those of you who failed to register in advance, we can accommodate a few last minute additions, please be ready to pay your $35 registration fee via cash, check or credit card at the 9 – 10 am registration.

We look forward to seeing you Sunday!

Adrian founded AEA in 1990. He recently returned to consulting full-time after serving as Executive Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center from 2007 – 2011. Prior to that, he was Executive Director of The Conran Foundation, where he was responsible for planning and managing the establishment of the Design Museum in London, which opened on Butlers Wharf in 1989. Between 1981 and 1986, he was a civil servant in the UK Treasury and the Cabinet Office, where he worked on service-wide efficiency reviews and privatization, and for two years ran the office of the Economic Secretary to the Treasury (the Minister responsible for monetary policy and regulation of the banking sector). From 1980 to 1982, he was a College Lecturer in Politics at University College, Oxford, where he received his B.A. (first class) and M.A. degrees, before undertaking graduate studies at London School of Economics.

Adrian writes and lectures extensively internationally on management and planning issues in the cultural sector, and has published, lectured and organized conferences for The J. Paul Getty Trust, Demos, The Wallace Foundation, Grantmakers in the Arts, The Jerwood Foundation, Clore Duffield Foundation, Sterling and Francis Clark Art Institute at Williams College, Bolz Center for Arts Administration at the University of Wisconsin, and the Australia Arts Council, among others. He is also a regular contributor to The Art Newspaper.

Adrian was a member of the Getty Leadership Institute’s advisory board from 2001 – 2007, and has served on the board of the Kaufman Center in New York, and Pathé Pictures, a film production company in London. He is a past member of the Governing Council of the National Museums and Galleries of Wales (1996 – 2000) and a member of the Royal Institute of British Architects’ Architecture Centre Committee (1997 – 2001). In May 2010, Adrian was a Scholar in Residence at Teachers College of Columbia University where he taught a graduate seminar series on ‘Special Topics in International Cultural Policy’.

Arts Advocacy 101: Learn the Language

by Ethan R. Clark

Welcome to Washington, DC the center of policy, politics, and protesters. Learn how to make your case for the arts at Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium (EALS) on April 15, 2012. Organized by American University Arts Management students, EALS provides you with professional collaboration and leading discussion on today’s arts management trends including arts advocacy.

EALS Panel discussion, Arts Advocacy 101: Learn the Languagefeatures DC’s leading experts in research, policy, and communication.  Learn the potential effects of research and policy on arts organizations. Know your role as an arts advocate to build and maintain successful civic and government relationships.  Apply your knowledge and experience to current and available data to distinguish your organization’s public message.

Anne L'Ecuyer

Anne L’Ecuyer

Professor of Arts Management at American University

Moderator Anne L’Ecuyer is a writer and a consultant who stays closely connected to an international network of city leaders, cultural professionals, and working artists. She is an expert in creative industries and cultural tourism in the United States, as well as the contributions of the arts toward educational, social, and environmental goals. L’Ecuyer’s experience producing seven national conferences and leadership events for cultural professionals and their allies in government, business, and education guides this panel with a perspective from across the board.

Today, Anne owns and operates the Washington Writer’s Retreat, a private writing and research residency in the nation’s capital. She is an essayist currently at work on a book-length collection that profiles cultural leaders in ten American cities. Anne also consults independently with businesses, nonprofits, and public institutions. She holds a Bachelors degree from Northern Arizona University, studied public policy at the University of Maryland at College Park, and now teaches at American University in the Arts Management program.

Jonathan Katz

Jonathan Katz

CEO of National Assembly of State Arts Agencies

Jonathan Katz, Ph.D., is CEO of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA), which was created by the 50 state and six jurisdictional arts agencies of the United States as their primary vehicle for arts policy development, advocacy, leadership development, research, information and communication. Dr. Katz consults globally on cultural policy, leadership development, strategic planning and effective advocacy. A former member of the U.S. Commission on UNESCO, he has advised the International Federation of Arts Councils and Cultural Agencies on its corporate development and facilitated its CEO Seminar for heads of national arts and cultural agencies at World Summits in England, South Africa and Australia.

Most recently, he has advised the governments of Korea and Canada and led a session on problem solving for Grantmakers in the Arts in Chicago. He is a founder of the Arts Education Partnership, the nation’s coalition of more than 100 organizations for the advancement of learning in the arts, and of the Cultural Advocacy Group, which is the forum through which the national cultural service organizations of the U.S. develop their united federal agenda. For the U.S. Department of State, he has conducted planning and professional development sessions with culturalagencies in five cities in Mexico. 

Robert Bettmann

Robert Bettmann

Advocacy Director for DC Advocates for the Arts

Robert Bettmann is a choreographer, community organizer, writer and administrator. He is the Advocacy Director for the DC Advocates for the Arts, Managing Editor of the arts magazine Bourgeon, and the author of the book Somatic Ecology. The Washington Post called his recent choreography, Quis Custodiet, “A powerful performance” (August, 2011). Later this spring the Arts Club of Washington will host the book launch and award event for the 2nd annual DC Student Arts Journalism competition.

Andrea Kreuzer

Andrea Kreuzer

Program Associate of Arts Education Partnership

Panelist Andrea Kreuzer is a Program Associate for Research and Policy at the Arts Education Partnership (AEP), based in Washington, DC. At AEP she has a substantial role in developing and authoring a new user-friendly database of outcomes-based arts education research and policy implications, called ArtsEdSearch. She’s also working with the U.S. Department of Education’s Professional Development for Arts Educators Program to develop and implement a rubric to assess the quality and effectiveness of grantee Annual Progress Reports. Andrea also co-wrote the AEP Research Bulletin, Music Matters: How music education helps students learn, achieve, and succeed which compiles and digests recent research on the benefits of music education.

Andrea received her Master of Arts degree in Museum Studies from The George Washington University and her Bachelor of Sciences degree in Photography and Art History from Ithaca College. Before coming to AEP Andrea worked in museum research and evaluation, and in exhibition development and design at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History and the National Geographic Society.
 

Jeffrey Herrmann

Jeffrey Herrmann

Managing Director of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

Panelist Jeffrey Herrmann became Managing Director of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in 2007 after eight seasons as Producing Director of Alaska’s Perseverance Theatre.  A NY native of Schenectady, NY, Jeffrey grew up in West Hartford, CT, and received his BA in English at Vassar College and his MFA in Theater Management at the Yale School of Drama.  Prior to his enrollment at Yale, he was Managing Director of the Albany Berkshire Ballet in Pittsfield, MA.  During his time at Yale, he worked at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles and as Associate Managing Director of the Yale Repertory Theatre.

Curious about trends and issues in arts policy and advocacy? Do you have questions for our panelists? Got anything in particular you want to hear from these panelists?

Share with us and bring the questions to the Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium on Sunday, April 15, 2012. See you there!

Beyond the Bottom Line: Running a Non-Profit in a For-Profit World

In this volatile economy, nonprofits are often last and hardest hit by financial downturns. How do they stay fiscally viable and mission-focused when faced with dwindling funding?  Are there aspects of the nonprofit model that are advantageous when compared to the for-profit model, specifically concerning the arts? What features of for-profits would be beneficial to integrate into the nonprofit world?

Is there a better way to manage arts organizations?

These incredible power-houses of the DC Arts Scene will answer these questions and more come the Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium on April 15th:

Jack Rasmussen

Director of Art Gallery & Curator of the American University Museum at the 
Katzen Gallery. A native of Seattle, Jack Rasmussen earned his BA in Art from Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA, before moving to Washington, DC, and completing an MFA in Painting, MA in Arts Management, and MA and PhD in Anthropology at American University. He worked in the Education Department of the National Gallery of Art before becoming the Assistant Director of the Washington Project for the Arts when it opened in 1975.

He left this position to open the Jack Rasmussen Gallery, one of the first commercial galleries to move to downtown Washington, and then launched Rockville Arts Place, served for ten years as the Executive Director of Maryland Art Place in Baltimore, and three years as Executive Director of the di Rosa Preserve: Art & Nature, a contemporary art museum and natural habitat in Napa, California.

Rasmussen is currently Director and Curator of the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center. (Bio From In The Loop)

B. Stanley

Stanley is an actor, director, pedagogue, puppeteer, and performance artist. He founded Theatre Du Jour in Washington DC in 1982 as an experimental group with an actor-based approach to creating new works. As an actor he has performed with The Living Theatre, Theatre Du Jour, Protean Forms Collective, The Hungry Fetus, The Puppet Company, Cherry Red Productions, Guillermo Gomez Pena, and in a myriad of unusual solo performances with his puppet, Ubu. Influenced by Antonin Artaud, Alfred Jarry, Jerzy Grotowski, Ingemar Lindh and like minds, he has directed a broad array of plays and performances, including Peter Handke’s Self Accusation, Antonin Artaud’s There Is No More Firmament and The Spurt of Blood, Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Cuckolded, George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion, and Ossie DavisPurlie Victorious. As director of Theatre Du Jour he had lead many company-created works including Poor Oedipus (an adaptation of the Oedipus story), Tower of Babel, Last Minute, and Ritual Play. He has worked with several poets, including Silvana Straw and Quique Aviles in creating performances that combine literature, acting and multimedia.

Currently, Stanley is Executive/Artistic Director of The District of Columbia Arts Center, where he encourages the development of cutting edge work by new and emerging theater groups in Washington, DC. He conducts workshops on acting, directing and theater production and participates in conferences and seminars abroad with regularity.

Lissa Rosenthal

Rosenthal is a dedicated champion of the arts and a formidable music fan. She is committed to improving the lives of musicians whose work enriches everyone. Lissa brings 20 years of experience in arts leadership, advocacy and nonprofit development to her role as Executive Director of the Future of Music Coalition.

Prior to joining FMC, she was a marketing and fundraising consultant and the Development Director of the Pittsburgh Glass Center,  Director of Programs for the American Council for the Arts (Americans for the Arts), Development Director of P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center — an affiliate of The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City.

As a social justice advocate, she has served as the National Program Director for PAX: Real Solutions to Gun Violence where she directed its highly acclaimed national public health campaigns dedicated to reducing youth gun violence in America, including SPEAK UP — a teen violence prevention initiative in partnership with Teen People Magazine, MTVNetworks and Atlantic Records.

She has also worked extensively in AIDS fundraising and event production, raising millions of dollars and awareness for AIDS service organizations nationwide. Her volunteer service includes work with Share Our Strength’s Taste of the Nation program, ranking her among their most effective national advocates. A promoter of all things green, she has authored several “green” cover features for Pittsburgh Magazine. (Bio From Dance USA)

Katherine Gibney

Kate Gibney joined the staff of Americans for the Arts in April 2006. As vice president of development, she oversees all fundraising undertaken on behalf of Americans for the Arts, collaborating closely with the Board of Directors, program staff, and senior leadership to create new opportunities for corporations, foundations, and individuals to support the organization’s goal of advancing the arts and arts education. Kate also coordinates development for the Americans for the Arts Foundation, which provides an array of planned giving vehicles for donors interested in providing legacy support for Americans for the Arts.

Kate brings to her role a wealth of knowledge and experience gained from her past tenures at The National Museum of Women in the Arts; the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery; and The Corcoran Gallery of Art, where she oversaw a corporate and foundation relations team focused on both annual and capital campaign fundraising. A singer in her spare time and an avid patron of the visual arts, Kate earned her bachelor’s degree with honors from Guilford College.

Participate in this and other amazing panels during the upcoming Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium on April 15. You may find the schedule of the Symposium here. Register here.

The Emerging Arts Advocate’s Guide to Climbing the Hill

By Ethan R. Clark

Capitol Lawn, Summer 2010 Ethan Clark

Whether we aspire to be a curator, producer, or director, lobbying and advocating is a normal practice for all to share our knowledge and personal testimonies of the importance and value of the arts. I can’t tell you how to dodge motorcades or avoid mobs of protestors while in DC but I will share with you a few tricks of the trade from one Emerging Arts Leader to another. Take note of these 4 tips to focus your craft of arts lobbying on the hill.

4.   Caution: Don’t Climb Alone!   

Nonprofits (with 501c3 status) often limit their lobbying because lobbying limits aren’t clearly defined by the law. Get informed of the laws and common misconceptions of nonprofit lobbying but don’t stress; there’s a good chance you won’t have to climb The Hill alone and your interest group/professional association will guide your visit according to IRS rules.

Hart Senate Office Building, "Mountain and Clouds" by Alexander Calder Ethan Clark

You’re only as good as your networks and knowledge. Professional associations, partnerships, working groups, and coalitions all share resources to increase knowledge, define effective policy agendas, and present influential data representing a policy maker’s constituents. Not to say that your voice won’t be heard but joining forces maximizes a policy maker’s time and your influence.

An organization’s capacity is viewed as an investment for government research. Not only do regional and national networks assist local nonprofits to participate in federal conversations but they also are continually the go-to organizations when government seeks info.

3.   For the Novice Navigator

Capitol's Original Front Entrance, Winter 2012 Ethan Clark

Okay so the hill isn’t that steep but prepare for a climb. Arrive at your building’s location 1hr prior to your meeting. Consider transportation delays and walking distances from parking lots/metro stations.  Arrive at your congressman’s office 30min prior to your meeting. Consider security checkpoints and the labyrinth of matching office doors.  Download a map and find a common meeting place to survey the land with your fellow climbers.

After hours of planning, travel, and productive conversation with your congressman, debrief (as appropriate) at these favorite eateries and cafes recommended by staffers and friends on the hill:  Sonoma, Bistro Bis, Johnny’s Half Shell, Pound the Hill, & Ebenezers Coffeehouse.

 2.    Reaching the Summit

Keep your cool and don’t let the impressive marble and memorials intimidate.  Remember whom your voice represents and your goal of delivering a clear and concise message. Start your conversation (not lecture) with a pleasant greeting and state your intentions and positions but don’t beat around the bush.

Inside the Capitol Dome, Fall 2011 Ethan Clark

Don’t derail on impassioned issues, follow talking points to progress conversation and maximize your time.  Prepare various lengths of dialogue from elevator speech to deep discussion; be confident. Also, practiced discourse with people of varying knowledge on your issue helps prepare you to communicate your message with the best tactics.

Stop the rhetoric and jargon. Clearly define the true problem and recommend a course of action that policy makers should take according to your interests. Provide analogies or examples of people your policy maker values the most: his/her voters. Policy options or alternatives should be included in your agenda.

Info = power but with information overload in Washington, no lobbyist expects a staff to read more than a 1-2 page brief or memo. Share new research to increase opportunities to schedule an appointment but keep it simple.

1.    Repelling 101

Washington Monument, Cherry Blossom Festival 2011 Ethan Clark

As DC Advocates for the Arts reminds us “Advocacy is an ongoing process. Legislators face so many competing causes that just one visit or one letter won’t make much of an impact.” Repel from your meeting on the hill but keep your rope tight and attached. Follow up with staffers on your meeting even if it’s cancelled. Staffers have a great influence on a policy maker’s decision and developing a relationship here is key to getting back in the door.

Did your meeting get bumped or shorten by a celebrity gallivanting around the hill? Don’t fret, hill staffers and especially Congressmen have extremely tight schedules and often work around the clock. If you had a successful conversation (or not), it is appropriate to follow up with a personal thank you note timed just right for an extra reminder before they vote.

I hope these tips ease your climb on Arts Advocacy Day! For further info…

Contact your state arts advocacy organization to learn more about how you can stay informed and engaged in the public policy process.

Visit websites of your favorite national associations to see how your local- and state-level issues relate to federal issues. It’s not uncommon for small and local organizations to participate in a larger network/coalition/legislative-working group to ensure their voice is represented on the hill.

EALS Benefit Reception Photographs: Thank you to Everyone!

Thank you to our 2012 Sponsors! Your talents and expertise truly made the Benefit Reception for the Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium a special event for all! Please continue to thank our sponsors and visit their websites to learn about upcoming events, specials, news and more!

Studio Gallery; www.studiogallerdc.com
Wineboy Wegman; www.wineboywegman.com
Cedric Terrell Photography; www.cedricterrell.com
The Burning Wicks;
College of Arts & Sciences Graduate Student Council; http://www.american.edu/cas/gsc/index.cfm

A special thank you to everyone who came out and supported us!

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF CEDRIC TERRELL PHOTOGRAPHY

What Makes a Good Arts Leader?

Michael Wilkerson: Assistant Professor of Arts Management at AU (Moderator)
Ian David Moss: Research Director, Fractured Atlas, and founder of Createquity.com
Jamie Bennett: Director of Public Affairs, NEA
Stephanie Evans Hanson: Local Arts Agency Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts
Michael Bobbitt: Producing Artistic Director, Adventure Theatre, and President of the League of Washington Theatres

PODCAST

We have all heard of the need for strong leadership in the arts field, especially as we encounter an era in which large numbers of arts managers are beginning to retire, thus leaving control to a new generation of leaders. What exactly is it, however, that makes a good leader? What makes a leader an effective force within his or her organization? What are the forces and issues that the leaders of tomorrow will need to address? How does technology affect leadership? And beyond the organization, how can a leader in the arts be an effective leader within the larger community? More importantly, why is it vital that arts leaders be leaders within their communities?

Find more amazing EALS podcasts HERE

Save the Date!


The 2012 EALS committee is excited to invite you to The Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium at American University in Washington, DC on Sunday, April 15, 2012. This is an annual meeting for young professionals who work in the arts — organized, executed, and run by AU Arts Management students. It is an opportunity to discuss the issues, unique or universal, that affect all arts organizations. Past keynote speakers have included Rachel Goslins, Ben Cameron, and Bob Lynch.


This year we’ll have three panels: Communicating the Arts – What Works, Running a Non-Profit in a For-Profit World, and Future Trends in Marketing leading up to our incredible keynote speaker, Adrian Ellis. Ellis, director of AEA Consulting and former Executive Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, has written and lectured extensively both nationally and internationally on management and planning issues in the cultural sector.

2012 EALS occurs right before Americans for the Arts 25th Arts Advocacy Day. This year’s EALS will be a great opportunity for arts administrators of all backgrounds and experiences to connect and discuss relevant issues in our ever changing art world.

EALS seeks to connect today’s arts with tomorrow’s leaders. Join us!

REGISTER here now: 
http://eals.eventbrite.com/The first 25 registrants can register at the discounted price of only $20! Email us at auartsymposium@american.edu if you have any questions.

Post-APAP NYC Reflection

45 dance companies in 4 days. After some reflection (and catching up on sleep) over the past couple days, I can, without a doubt, say that seeing so much dance in such a short period of time was most definitely the highlight of my APAP|NYC experience. For those who aren’t aware, APAP|NYC is the annual international conference for the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, a “national service and advocacy organization dedicated to developing and supporting a robust performing arts presenting field and the professionals who work within it.”

Slew of programs for the showcases I attended

I (Cathy Teixeira) attended the conference with some co-workers from American Dance Institute (ADI), a presenting organization just outside Washington, D.C. One of our main goals for this conference was to get a feel for what companies were out there, both nationally and internationally, see what they were creating, and of course to see if there were any potential companies ADI should look into presenting in the future. If it weren’t for the APAP conference, it would not have been possible to see so much in so short of a time span. I can’t begin to imagine how much work goes into organizing and coordinating showcases, not just for dance but for all disciplines, so I commend APAP for their fine work.

The showcases, usually running from 9:30am to as late as 10pm, took place in various venues across the city. Often times, the agents and/or choreographers would introduce the piece and indicate whether or not the companies were eligible for funding from NEFA’s National Dance Project (NDP). Working in development, I especially appreciated this key

Networking Opportunity-- Post-showcase reception for presenters and artists

piece of information. Presenting can get very expensive, and receiving a bit of support can make all the difference in whether or not an organization can afford to present certain companies. I also noticed that most choreographers would emphasize that fact that their work was flexible (in the number of dancers, staging, size, etc) and customizable based on the financial capacity of the presenter and the confines of the performance space. Again, another important factor when considering the possibility of presenting a company.

One lesson I learned: choreographers are pretty darn clever. Several of them had incorporated a community engagement component to their work. From a fundraising perspective this is wonderful because it makes raising money a lot easier when you are creating a unique experience for the audience/community that goes beyond just sitting in a theater. The most common way to do this is through master classes, post-show talks, or meet-the-artist receptions. But in David Dorfman Dance‘s newest work Come, and Back Again the music of Patti Smith is played by a five-piece band; a band that can tour with the company or alternatively, be comprised of local musicians in the presenter’s location. The music would be sent ahead of time, the company would come, they’d rehearse a couple times, and BAM! put on the show. Genius. I know this isn’t a novel idea, but David is creating opportunities for true community involvement by including this possibility in his work.

David, aside from being one of THE nicest people I’ve had the pleasure of meeting, has a knack for involving the audience and making his art truly accessible. ADI presented his wildly successful work Prophets of Funk back in November, and at the end of the show, the audience was invited to come dance with the company on stage. Check out the awesome moment below:

There were so many impressive dance companies, but this blog post would get out of hand if I tried to mention them all so here are just a couple of my personal* favorites:

Lar Lubovitch Dance Company– Lubovitch’s choreography was simply beautiful. I particularly enjoyed their setting of Histoire du Soldat, composed by Stravinsky. The

Lubovitch's Histoire du Soldat

narrative (a soldier sells his violin/soul to the devil and tries to win it back), music, and choreography worked together seamlessly resulting in a cohesive piece.

Keigwin + Company– Keigwin’s work is often described as “sexy” but it’s so much more than that; it’s clever and utterly captivating. In fact, I was so drawn in that I didn’t notice how badly my leg had fallen asleep. They’ll be at the Kennedy Center in March— even if you aren’t a dance person, they are a MUST SEE.

Brian Brooks Moving Company. Photo (c) Christopher Duggan

Brian Brooks Moving Company– The company performed an excerpt of DESCENT, described by the NY times as being “visually arresting”. And it was just that. In the duet, one dancer “manipulated” the other dancer’s falling weight, creating quite an impressive effect.

In addition to all the dance we saw, Jessica (the Development Director of ADI) and I scheduled three consultation meetings: a fundraising consultation with The North Group, Inc. and meetings with the NEA presenting and dance specialists. I didn’t know what to expect in these one-on-one meetings, but they proved to be informative and encouraging. For the fundraising consultation, Jessica gave the consultant a run-down of the current development situation, and then we were given ideas on where we should be prioritizing our efforts. As for the NEA meetings, the presenting and dance specialists were able to tell us what types of grants we were eligible/most appropriate to apply for, and which grant cycle would give us a greater competitive edge. It was great to meet the specialists in person, and to receive positive feedback on what was going on at ADI.

One of the sessions I attended was called What Jazz Can Teach Us About Winning Audiences, where Christy Farnbauch and Bob Breithaupt of Jazz Arts Group presented the results of Jazz Audience Initiatives, their ground-breaking study on jazz audiences. To be honest, I was a bit skeptical about the session being applicable to the dance field, but actually left with a lot of useful information and ideas. They found that 86% of ticket

Taken from the full JAI report.

buyers (ages 18-34) attend because of recommendations from friends and family. As they pointed out, this is intuitive information, but the research just further proves the importance of the initiators (those doing the inviting) in building an audience. It challenged me to consider how we can identify these initiators and what we can do to reward/provide incentives for them to ultimately become active advocates of an organization. For the full report, click here.

If you’ve been reading the wonderful blog posts from my classmate and fellow EALS committee member, Steven Dawson, you’ll find that our experiences at APAP were quite different. (In fact, we only ran into each other once the entire conference!) The great thing is that the APAP Conference is so comprehensive that there’s a rich experience for everyone: across all disciplines, presenter or exhibitor, student or executive. There is so much going on that you can mix and match sessions/meeting/showcases and tailor your schedule to fit your needs. Thank you APAP for a wonderful conference!

-Cathy Teixeira

___________________

This is a non-APAP related piece, but something that I thought was worth mentioning, especially for opera lovers. I had Monday night free, so on my bus ride up to New York, I

Obligatory tourist-y photo of Lincoln Center

decided to see if there were any operas at the Met that I could go see. It was a piece of cake to get $25 student tickets (for orchestra seats that are usually $95!) to their new production of Faust. And if you aren’t a student, you can go to the box office two hours before a show and get $20 rush tickets.

*Disclaimer: These are my own personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of American Dance Institute.

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EALS = JOBS.

As in if you come to EALS, listen up, speak up, chat up, and look up, you will find yourself better prepared to go forth and search, find, and LAND that sucker! Please send us love letters of your success stories and know that while the journey is rough.. with EALS it’s paved with cookies and hugs.

Proverbially.

And yes, if you ask specifically, we will give you advice on what to wear. I’ll be Stacy and Ethan will be Clinton. Arts Mangers What to Wear coming to TLC 2024.

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